WWMWD?
#StomachAppreciationSaturday

This is a screen capture from the consent form for weight-loss surgery at a North Carolina hospital, chosen at random. So-called weight-loss surgery is being done to teens. (I say so-called because lots of people don’t lose weight or regain most or all of the weight they lose after surviving stomach amputation.) Although it’s presented as a health-enhancing surgery, it carries many physically devastating risks and the majority of patients are women. I wonder how many of them know they won’t be able to use oral birth control.

#StomachAppreciationSaturday

This is a screen capture from the consent form for weight-loss surgery at a North Carolina hospital, chosen at random. So-called weight-loss surgery is being done to teens. (I say so-called because lots of people don’t lose weight or regain most or all of the weight they lose after surviving stomach amputation.) Although it’s presented as a health-enhancing surgery, it carries many physically devastating risks and the majority of patients are women. I wonder how many of them know they won’t be able to use oral birth control.

Race is not a biological category that naturally produces health disparities because of genetic differences. Race is a political category that has staggering biological consequences because of the impact of social inequality on people’s health.
Dorothy E. Roberts, Fatal Intervention (via lamaracuya)
How many weight-loss surgeons does it take?

Question: How many weight-loss surgeons does it take to change a lightbulb?

Answer: 57.


- The first weight-loss surgeon tells the homeowners their entire house will be dark forever if they don’t immediately hand over $20,000. He looks deep into the homeowner’s eyes, gently rests his hand on the homeowner’s shoulder, and says, ‘Don’t you want to see your children grow up?’

- The second weight-loss surgeon unscrews all of the working lightbulbs in the house and cuts all but one of the wires to the fuse box.

- The third weight-loss surgeon visits the homeowner every few weeks to remind them that any darkness is all their fault. He says, ‘We performed a perfect light bulb change! You’re to blame for the lack of light in your life. You must be flipping the light switches too much and you want to read too late at night.’

- The other 54 weight-loss surgeons form a professional organization and lobby the federal government to require that home insurance policies pay them $20,000 a pop for their lightbulb changing operation. One night every year, in every major city, they invite their former customers to participate in a candlelight vigil to raise awareness about the lightbulb crisis and the good work that weight-loss surgeons are doing to fight it.

— from Marilyn Wann

consultingpiskies:

THEY ARE ALL OKAY, and all those things could exist in THE SAME WOMAN. Women shouldn’t be valued because we are strong, or kick-ass, but because we are people. So don’t focus on writing characters who are strong. Write characters who are people.madlori

Modeled on this post. This quote needed a gifset that featured a more diverse group women. Because my takeaway from Lori’s marvelous answer (seriously, go read all of it) is that representation matters and that great female characters do not—and should not—fit into the same cookie cutter mold. Because actual women are not one size fits all. And the irony of having that message cross my dash repeatedly with exclusively young, white, straight, cis women who match a prescriptive definition of beauty was getting to me.

I’m Marilyn of WIllendorf! Here’s my report for the SF Weekly’s blog, about a street action I organized in response to a totally mean-spirited “Santa the Hutt” window display at a San Francisco shop. The Willendorf Selfie Station was total fun! (Photo by Tigress Osborn.)

I’m Marilyn of WIllendorf! Here’s my report for the SF Weekly’s blog, about a street action I organized in response to a totally mean-spirited “Santa the Hutt” window display at a San Francisco shop. The Willendorf Selfie Station was total fun! (Photo by Tigress Osborn.)

It’s today!!!

In 1983, feminist non-profit publisher Aunt Lute brought out a founding fat activist anthology: “Shadow on a Tightrope: Writings by Women on Fat Oppression.” On Friday, Nov. 8, join the blog carnival celebrating the 30th anniversary. How have things changed? How do things still need to change? What was your first contact with weight liberation?

fatdisid:

Fat studies researcher looking to pay $10 to self-identified fat young adults of color for interviews on fat identity, sexuality, race, and the Internet.

Hello everyone!

My name is Philippe Fradet and I am a graduate student at San Francisco State University in the Sexuality Studies…